New lawsuit targets Prevagen challenges claims that the supplement to improve memory

first_img March 13, 2019 New lawsuit targets Prevagen, challenges claims that the supplement to improve memory Updated: 1:48 PM Sasha Foo, Sasha Foo center_img Categories: Health, Local San Diego News, National & International News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A popular supplement that claims to boost memory is the target of a new lawsuit. The supplement called Prevagen is sold in nearly every major retail store in the country, but critics say it’s worthless.In advertisements on TV and online, the manufacturer of Prevagen says the product will support a “sharper mind,” “clearer thinking” and “healthy brain function.”The product label says that clinical tests demonstrated some improvements in cognitive function in as little as 90 days.However, the plaintiffs in a class action suit fled in Texas in late February said those claims are false, deceptive and designed to “dupe consumers ” into buying a supplement that has no effect on the brain.Prevagen contains a synthetic protein called apoaequorin, modeled on a protein found in jellyfish.Dr. Neal Devaraj, a biochemist at the University of California San Diego said a protein taken orally would be broken down in the digestive process before it could reach the bloodstream. Since apoaequorin is a large water soluble protein, Devaraj said it would be unlikely for it to pass the barrier from the bloodstream into the brain.Even though many may question the scientific basis for Prevagen’s claims, the manufacturer is still permitted to make its claims through its commercials, on the product package and on the bottle itself. Miro Copic, a professor of marketing at San Diego State University said that products marketed as dietary supplements face much less regulatory oversight.“The dietary supplement space is kind of the ‘Wild, Wild West,’ ” Copic said. Unlike pharmaceutical drugs, Prevagen isn’t subject to review by the Food and Drug Administration.The supplements are covered by a 1994 law that’s less protective of consumers.In the stores we visited, we found that the product was nearly sold out. A bottle of the extra strength formula sells for $60 a bottle, for a 30 day supply.Two years ago, the company that makes Prevagen was sued by the Federal Trade Commission. In its defense, Quincy Bioscience, based in Madison, Wisconsin argued that it had performed clinical trials to support its claims.The FTC countered that the initial studies were inconclusive. However, the judge hearing the case ruled in Prevagen’s favor, after the supplement maker went back to the data, and selectively picked data subgroups to support its marketing claims.While Prevagen prevailed in that 2017 case, last month a federal appeals court overturned the decision, setting the stage for the latest lawsuit. Copic said the suit poses challenges for the plaintiffs.“You’re not being forced to buy this. It’s not a prescription.They’re making no claims that it will help you specifically. That’s why a lot of times, lawsuits in this arena are really hard to win,” Copic said.Quincy Bioscience declined our request for an interview about the lawsuit.A company spokesperson told us, “Nevertheless, we believe the claims are baseless and we will continue to fight these allegations on behalf of the millions of consumers who take Prevagen every day to improve their memory.”The class action lawsuit filed several weeks ago is seeking reimbursement for the amount the class members spent on Prevagen and the difference between Prevagen and the market price of generic protein pills of a similar quantity and type. Posted: March 13, 2019last_img read more

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In Super Bowl ad Mint Mobile tries to win customers with chunky

first_img Super Bowl 2019 See All Best Super Bowl 2019 commercials ranked: Harrison Ford, The Dude, the Backstreet Boys and more Avengers, Captain Marvel, Twilight Zone: All the must-see Super Bowl 2019 trailers Super Bowl 2019: New Avengers: Endgame trailer shows heroes at their best Super Bowl 2019 commercials: Watch them all here Super Bowl 2019 memes: Game of Thrones, SpongeBob, Adam Levine’s nipples SpongeBob SquarePants barely shows up at Super Bowl 2019 halftime show See all of our Super Bowl coverage reading • In Super Bowl ad, Mint Mobile tries to win customers with chunky milk ALRIGHT, WHO AT MINT THOUGHT A “CHUNKY MILK” COMMERCIAL WOULD WORK DURING A TIME MOST FOLKS ARE EATING. #3PercentSB— Kiku Marie 🎎 (@ohkiku_) February 4, 2019 Share your voice Seriously @mint too many people are eating to show chunky milk like that!!! #SuperBowlAds pic.twitter.com/WbXgdyQko5— Brie E Anderson (@brie_e_anderson) February 4, 2019 • That chunky milk made me nauseous🤢#SuperBowl pic.twitter.com/U2cT0KG6bL— @AmandaOhSnap! (@AmandaOhSnap1) February 4, 2019 Here’s something to cleanse your eyes from that chunky milk ad. pic.twitter.com/gNtLk32rvr— Kahlúa (@Kahlua) February 4, 2019 Super Bowl 2019 This year’s Super Bowl 2019 commercials creeped viewers out or inspired them but this Super Bowl ad from Mint Mobile turned  stomachs. Because Mint Mobile wants to attract more customers one glass of chunky-style milk at a time. In a new commercial — which ran during Sunday’s Super Bowl  — Mint Mobile advertises a deal for wireless internet for $20 a month, with two months free. (Learn more about Mint Mobile’s deal.) That deal includes 8GB per month of 4G LTE plus unlimited talk and text messaging. More Super Bowlcenter_img But when the possible customer in the commercial says, “That’s not right,” Mint Mobile’s mascot assures him it is right, whereas chunky-style milk, well not so much. We see not only chunky milk in all it’s textured glory, but people actually drinking it. Yuck.People reacted on social media just as you might expect, with a collective sigh of repulsion.  Feb 28 • Last chance to get 3 months of Mint Mobile service for $20 Feb 7 • Every Avengers: Endgame character flash at the start of that Super Bowl trailer Tags 0 See the rest of the Super Bowl 2019 commercials here.  Aug 14 • Raising the entry-level bar Everyone involved in the chunky milk commercial should be burned alive.— Melanie Trump (@noradaexploraa) February 4, 2019 Post a comment May 7 • 2020 Toyota Supra first drive review: More reset than reboot Mobilelast_img read more

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New Intel chip flaw leaves your PC exposed again

first_img Hacking Privacy Security Close up of a computer chip. Intel and independent security researches revealed Tuesday that the company’s chips had a flaw that could let skilled hackers steal sensitive information from your device’s microprocessor. Monika Sakowska / EyeEm / Getty Images Intel chips have another flaw that could let skilled hackers pull sensitive information from microprocessors, Intel and independent security researchers said Tuesday.The researchers say a flaw in the microprocessors is vulnerable to four new attacks, each of which could capture information like encryption keys and passwords — the building blocks of security for the rest of your computer. The research was reported earlier by Wired, which said the flaw affects millions of PCs.Multiple researchers spread across more than a dozen different organizations released their findings about the flaw on Tuesday. The flaw is in the same family as the the Meltdown and Spectre flaws announced in 2018, and it has some similarities. First, it affects data stored on your chip that the hardware keeps around to perform tasks more quickly. What’s more, the new flaw requires hackers to get malicious software to run on your device before they can steal information from the chip. The announcement indicates that this type of flaw, which was novel when reports of Meltdown and Spectre were first announced, is an area of intense research, and experts might continue to find serious chip flaws down the road. Intel and other chip makers face the challenge of addressing flaws that allow these kinds of attacks without sacrificing the performance of their microprocessors.Intel said in a statement that the best way to protect yourself from attacks targeting this flaw is to keep your system software updated. The flaw has been fixed on Intel Core processors from the 8th and 9th generation, as well as the Intel Xeon Scalable processor family’s 2nd generation. Other chips can be fixed with updates to software called microcode, which solve the problem without having to rewrite the hard coded features of a microprocessor.The company also released data on how its fixes to the flaw are affecting different processors’ performance. Tags Comments Share your voice 9last_img read more

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