FORMER ETIC MAN HITS OUT AT DIRECTOR CLAIM

first_imgA FORMER employee of Francois de Dietrich and Etic Solutions has hit out at claims he was a company director.David Kavanagh, based in Derry, said he had only every been an employee of Etic and left ‘several years ago’.Mr Kavanagh runs a successful PR business in the North West. FORMER ETIC MAN HITS OUT AT DIRECTOR CLAIM was last modified: April 3rd, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Breaking: Masked gunmen threaten family in overnight burglary

first_imgFour masked men have broken into a house in Donegal and threatened the occupants.The men, who were armed with handguns and a baton, broke into the house at Drumcairn, Manorcunningham at around 8.15pm last night.Gardai have confirmed they are investigating an aggravated burglary at the house. It is not understood that any occupants of the house were injured during the terrifying incident.However, Gardai have confirmed that damage was done to the property.A Garda spokesman told Donegal Daily “Gardai are investigating an alleged aggravated burglary that occurred in a house in Drumcairn, Manorcunningham, Co. Donegal on Monday the 25th of February 2019 at approx. 8.15pm.“Four males wearing masks entered the house with is what is believed to be handguns and a baton. No injuries to occupants, damage done to property. The males left shortly after. “There have been no arrests and investigations are ongoing.”Breaking: Masked gunmen threaten family in overnight burglary was last modified: February 27th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:burglarydonegalgunsmanorcunninghamlast_img read more

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Take a trip to Northern Cape

first_imgThe Kimberley tram, a popular tourist attraction, is South Africa’s only operational electric tram. Rock engravings at Wildebeest Kuil. The famous Big Hole is one of the largest hand-excavated open-cast mines in the world. South Africa’s national animal, the springbok, roams freely around the Northern Cape.(Images: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free images, visit the image library)MEDIA CONTACTS • Northern Cape Tourism authority+27 53 833 1434 / +27 53 832 2657RELATED ARTICLES• Khoisan couple home at last• SKA: who gets what• NC ideal for extreme sports• Bloodhound brings world focus to SA• Pecking order re-established in NCRomaana NaidooStepping into the Northern Cape is much like walking onto the set of an American western. There are the acres of arid land, mostly desolate landscape, and sparsely populated, far-flung, tiny, old towns. Indeed, this picturesque province is South Africa’s most unusual travel destination.The province is renowned for its breathtaking southern Kalahari scenery and Richtersveld mountain desert landscapes, and, of course, its diamonds. It is also the home of the world’s “first people” – the enigmatic San-Bushmen, as well as the Griqua, a subgroup of South Africa’s heterogeneous and multi-racial coloured people; and the Nama or Namaqua, an African ethnic group spread across South Africa, Namibia and Botswana. Northern Cape is filled with uncanny surprises.It is a prime destination for adventuring outdoorsy types, and it should be at the top of the list for travellers curious about indigenous people and archaeology. Then there’s the interesting geology, diamonds, architecture and Anglo Boer War history, as well as cultural and liberation history. It is also home to two of the country’s biggest rivers, the Orange and the Vaal, and has the world’s largest wild flower display.Between July and September, Namakwa, the only arid hotspot in the world, sheds its dry and desolate facade and is covered by a duvet of wild flowers of every hue, drawing tourists from across the country and around the world. Namakwa is part of the Succulent Karoo biome and contains more than 6 000 plant species, 250 species of birds, 78 species of mammals, 132 species of reptiles and amphibians, and an unknown number of insects.With its capital in the old diamond-mining town of Kimberley, Northern Cape is 362 591.41km² in size, making it the largest province in South Africa. It has a population of approximately 1.058-million.Stepping into KimberleyKimberley, which was founded in 1871, is set against the backdrop of a flat landscape with no prominent topographic features in its urban limits.The sights and sounds of the original diamond rush – when up to 30 000 miners furiously worked some 3 600 claims using rudimentary equipment and living mostly in tents – have long gone, but memories of the town’s glory days linger. Many of the old buildings still stand, and museums lend a historic ambience to the modern city. There is also a reconstruction of the original town alongside the famous Big Hole.Located at the intersection of the N12 and N8 national roads, Kimberley, known as the “City that Sparkles” or the “Diamond City”, is a gateway to other Northern Cape destinations, including the Mokala National Park, nature reserves and numerous game farms and hunting lodges, as well as historic sites. Today, the town is the seat of the Northern Cape Provincial Legislature and the Provincial Administration, and services the mining and agricultural sectors of the region.The city has considerable historical significance thanks to its diamond mining past and the siege during the Second Boer War. Notable personalities such as Cecil John Rhodes and Barney Barnato made their fortunes here, and the roots of the multinational De Beers Company can be traced to its early days.From humble beginningsIt all began in 1866, when Erasmus Jacobs found a small pebble on the banks of the Orange River on his father’s farm, De Kalk. The pebble was bought by Schalk van Niekerk, who later sold it. Not so much a pebble, this sparkling stone proved to be a 21.25 carat diamond, and became known as the Eureka. Three years later, Van Niekerk sold another diamond, also found in the De Kalk vicinity, the Star of South Africa for US$17 000 (R158 000). It was promptly resold on the London market for $38 000 (R353 000).Also in 1869, an even larger 83.50 carat diamond was found on the slopes of Colesberg Kopje on the farm Vooruitzigt, which belonged to the De Beers brothers. This resulted in the famous “New Rush”, which led to 800 claims within a month worked by two to three thousand men. The region was converted into a mine, and called the Kimberley Mine. As miners flocked to the area in their thousands, the hill disappeared and subsequently became known as the Big Hole.From mid-July 1871 to 1914, 50 000 miners dug the hole, yielding 2 722kg of diamonds. The Big Hole has a surface area of 17 hectares and is 463m wide. It was excavated to a depth of 240m, but was partially in-filled with debris, reducing its depth to about 215m; since then it has accumulated water to a depth of 40m, leaving a visible hole of 175m deep.The Big Hole however pales in comparison with the Cullinan Mine, the third biggest diamond producer in South Africa, which is situated some 40km northeast of Pretoria in Gauteng province. This mine goes down 760m by means of 560km of tunnels. It’s considerably bigger than the more famous Big Hole, measuring a kilometre across and half-a-kilometre wide, and leaving an excavation into the earth of 700m. It is continually widening, as 80 000 tons of rock fall into it every year.By 1873, Kimberley was the second largest town in South Africa, with a population of some 40 000. In 1998, the Kimberley Comprehensive Urban Plan estimated that Kimberley had 210 800 people in 46 207 households. A decade later, it was estimated there were some 250 000 inhabitants, comprising 46% black, 40% coloured and 13% white, speaking Afrikaans (49%), Tswana (33%), English (7.5%), Xhosa (5.6%) and Sotho (2.2%).In the late nineteenth century, Kimberley was the hub of development in South Africa, transforming the country’s agrarian economy into one more dependent on its mineral wealth. One of the key features of the new economic arrangement was migrant labour, drawing workers from across the subcontinent. The labour compound system developed in Kimberley in the 1880s was later replicated on the gold mines and elsewhere.The city also housed South Africa’s first stock exchange, the Kimberley Royal Stock Exchange, which opened on 2 February 1881. And on 2 September 1882, Kimberley became the first town in the southern hemisphere to install electric street lighting. By 1896, the first South African mining school was opened, though it later relocated to Johannesburg and formed part of the University of the Witwatersrand.TransportSouth African aviation originated in Kimberley, remembered in the Pioneers of Aviation Museum. The town was also connected by rail to the cities along the Cape Colony coastline in 1872; however, the railway line from Cape Town to Kimberley was only completed in 1885. In the 1930s, Kimberley boasted the best night-landing facilities on the continent; today the Kimberley Airport has regular flights from Johannesburg and Cape Town.Passenger train services to and from Kimberley are also provided by national rail operator Spoornet’s Shosholoza Meyl, with connections south to Cape Town and Port Elizabeth and north to Johannesburg. Luxury railway travel is possible on the main north-south line by the Blue Train and Rovos Rail.ClimateNorthern Cape’s weather is typical of arid and semi-arid temperatures. The scant annual rainfall (50-400mm) in the province is unreliable and summer temperatures – from December to February – range between a scorching 33˚ and 36˚ Celsius. In winter, from June to August, days are warm but at the onset of night the temperature drops spectacularly: the average minimum is -6˚ Celsius, with snow blanketing the mountains.Around Kimberley itself, summers are hot and relatively wet, and winters are cold and dry. The infrequent summer rains tend to take the form of occasional severe thunderstorms rather than prolonged soft showers. It is not unusual for winter night-time temperatures to drop below freezing.Tourist attractionsAround the Big Hole, previously known as the Kimberley Mine Museum, is a recreated townscape and museum. It has a Big Hole viewing platform and other features, and houses a rich collection of artefacts and information from the early days of the city. One of the exhibits is Rhodes’ grand railway carriage that carried him as governor of the Cape of Good Hope to the Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) that he created. Also at the mine museum is the first house built in Kimberley, as well as the first church.At the McGregor Museum, visitors can explore major research collections as well as learn about the history and ecology of Northern Cape. It celebrated its centennial in 2007, reflected in displays at the museum’s headquarters at the Sanatorium in Belgravia and nine branch museums.Other places of interest in Kimberley include the William Humphreys Art Gallery, the Kimberley Africana Library, Dunluce and Rudd House museums, Pan Africanist Congress founder Robert Sobukwe’s law office, the Sol Plaatje Museum, the Transport Spoornet Museum, the Clyde N Terry Hall of Militaria, and the Freddie Tate Museum. The memorial cenotaph was erected originally to commemorate the fallen of World War I; plaques were added in memory of fallen Kimberley soldiers in World War II. There is also a memorial dedicated to the Kimberley Cape Coloured Corps who lost their lives in the Battle of Square Hill during World War I.The Concentration Camp Memorial remembers those who were interned in the Kimberley concentration camp during the Second Boer War, and is located in front of the Dutch Reformed Church. The Henrietta Stockdale statue, by Jack Penn, commemorates the Anglican nun, Sister Henrietta, who petitioned the Cape parliament to pass a law recognising nursing as a profession and requiring compulsory state registration of nurses – a first in the world.The Miners’ Memorial, also known as the Diggers’ Fountain, is located in the Oppenheimer Gardens and was designed by Herman Wald. It was built in honour of all the miners of Kimberley, and consists of five life-sized diggers lifting a diamond sieve. The Honoured Dead Memorial commemorates those who died defending the city during the Siege of Kimberley in the Anglo-Boer War.The Sol Plaatje statue, sculpted by Johan Moolman, is at the Civic Centre, formerly the Malay Camp, and situated approximately where Plaatje had his printing press in 1910 to 1913. Other memorials and statues in the historical town include the Burger Monument near Magersfontein Battlefield, the Cape Police Memorial, the Mayibuye Memorial, the Rhodes equestrian statue, and the Malay Camp Memorial.Rock artThroughout the Karoo one finds visually enticing examples of rock engravings left by the nomadic people that once frequented the area. Most of the images are found on low ridges of dolerite rock, the black boulder fields. Rock gongs (rocks that make echoing sounds when hit) can also be found on sites such as Keurfontein near Vosburg and Thomas’ Farm near Hopetown.A community-based public rock art project, the Wildebeest Kuil Rock Art Centre, stands on the outskirts of Kimberley. Indigenous San and Khoe people, with researchers and other relevant parties, are involved in conserving the engravings, of which there are more than 400, spread over a small sacred hill.In South Africa, there are some 15 000 recorded rock art sites, but there are many yet to be discovered. Most of the rock art in Southern Africa was made by Later Stone Age people, ancestors of the San, according to the McGregor Museum.This art occurs in two forms: engravings and paintings. Engravings are found on the country’s dry inland plateau, while paintings occur in mountainous areas such as the Drakensberg, and the Cederberg in the Western Cape.The Wildebeest Kuil engravings were made by the “pecking” technique, where the artist used a hard, pointed stone to chip away the outer crust of the rock and bring out the lighter colour underneath. The exposed portions gradually weather to again become as dark as the outer layer.The exact age of the engravings at Wildebeest Kuil is not known, but experts estimate their age at between 1 000 and 2 000 years. Older engraved stones have been found at Wonderwerk Cave near Kuruman in the Northern Cape, in excavated levels dating back 2 000 and 10 000 years, and rock paintings in southern Namibia have been dated to about 27 000 years ago.In a nutshell, Kimberley is a gateway to uncovering the treasures of Northern Cape, through what once was a shanty town born of an influx of miners trying to reap the wealth that lay beneath the soil. Today, it is a flourishing city boasting a mixture of Victorian buildings that complement the modern twists of the CBD. While, lacking the fast pace and hustle and bustle of South Africa’s larger urban hubs such as Johannesburg, it is still in some ways one of the country’s most innovative towns.last_img read more

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New Hampshire ~ Corporate, Personal Income Taxes: Filing Deadlines Extended Due to Emancipation Day; Reminder New Due Dates for Partnerships and Corporations

first_imgCCH Tax Day ReportThe New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration has issued a technical information release addressing the effect that the Emancipation Day holiday observed on April 17, 2017, will have on New Hampshire filing deadlines. Emancipation Day is a holiday in the District of Columbia and also applies to the Internal Revenue Service. Because of Emancipation Day, New Hampshire interest and dividends and business tax (business profits tax and business enterprise tax) returns that would normally be due on April 15, 2017, will be due on Tuesday April 18, 2017. Return due dates for all other tax types with a due date of April 15th are not impacted by the Emancipation Day holiday and are due on Monday April 17th.Further, the Department reminds taxpayers that recently enacted legislation provides that partnerships must file their return now on or before the 15th day of the third month following the expiration of the tax period and that all other business organizations, including corporations, must file on or before the 15th day of the fourth month following the expiration of the tax period. These changes make New Hampshire business tax due dates consistent with recent federal changes to partnership and corporate tax returns. The due dates for all other business profits tax and business enterprise tax filings remain unchanged. Tax Year 2016 forms are now available http://www.revenue.nh.gov/forms/index.htm.Technical Information Release TIR 2017-001, New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration, January 13, 2017, ¶200-924last_img read more

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How To Raise A Lot More Money Now – a free eBook from Network for Good

first_imgAt Network for Good, we’re always looking for the latest and greatest resources to help nonprofits engage with supporters online. And we get a lot of questions about how to raise more money online – now! Inspired by the great work that nonprofits do every day, I called on some of the smartest people I know in the nonprofit fundraising world to help me write this eBook and give you 50 creative ideas that you can start using today to raise more money for your cause. Get your free copy of How to Raise a Lot More Money Now: 50 Great Ideas from 11 Top Experts. I’d like to give a special thanks to all of my friends who contributed: Jeff Brooks, Mark Rovner, Jocelyn Harmon, Alia McKee, Sarah Durham, Kivi Leroux Miller, Chris Forbes, Nancy Schwartz, Beth Kanter, and Allison Fine.last_img read more

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The Tom Brady Ruling Means Nearly Half An Extra Win For The

That’s a big spike, but the Patriots were already expected to be the best team in the AFC East before Brady’s return. The nullification of Brady’s suspension will really matter when the playoffs start — the Patriots are now expected to have the second-best record in the AFC (New England passed the Broncos, though they still rank behind the Colts). So Goodell’s inept handling of Brady’s suspension didn’t just gift the Patriots nearly half a win; it might also have gifted them a higher playoff seed.UPDATE (Sept. 3, 3:42 p.m.): This post has been updated throughout with new data from an updated Football Power Index model. Somebody ought to teach Roger Goodell how to suspend a guy properly. On Thursday, Judge Richard Berman overturned Teflon Tom Brady’s four-game suspension in connection with the Deflategate scandal. You can read all sorts of legal analysis elsewhere, but here’s the basic gist: Goodell, the NFL commissioner, didn’t justly suspend Brady, nor did he properly notify Brady during the process that a four-game suspension was a possible punishment. (Berman did not rule on whether Brady was involved in Deflategate in the first place.)The Patriots rejoiced, which they’ve gotten good at in the past decade and a half. And they should: Now that Brady is eligible to play the first four games of the season, the Patriots are even more likely to make the playoffs than they already were. ESPN Stats and Info projected1The projection is derived from Stats and Info’s Football Power Index, a nifty model that assigns every NFL team a strength rating for its offense, defense and special teams and then simulates the schedule 10,000 times, tracking how often each team wins its division, conference and even the Super Bowl. that without Brady for four games, the Patriots would make the playoffs 68 percent of the time. Now it’s 74 percent. read more

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Ohio State Kansas different stakes still the same

With the faintest of grins, Ohio State’s Lenzelle Smith Jr. made sure to note that former Kansas big man Thomas Robinson won’t be in Columbus to bully the Buckeyes in the paint Saturday. “That’s a huge relief,” the junior guard said, as if the thought of the hulking 6-foot-10, 240-pound forward evoked memories – perhaps agonizing ones – of what happened the last time the teams met. Largely thanks to his 19 points and eight boards in last year’s Final Four matchup, Robinson, who was selected as the 5th overall pick in the 2012 NBA Draft, helped ensure the anti-climatic end to what would’ve been OSU’s first national championship berth since 2007. Kansas coach Bill Self’s squad rallied from nine down at halftime to best the Buckeyes, 64-62, before falling to Kentucky on the sport’s biggest stage. Word of that might’ve taken some time to reach Smith Jr., though. “I didn’t continue to watch college basketball,” he said. Almost eight months later – and more than a year ago since the Buckeyes’ first setback against the Jayhawks in a similarly hyped early-season matchup last December – OSU (9-1) might have another chance at revenge. But Smith Jr., who admitted to have “been waiting for this game since our schedule got released” stopped short of calling Saturday’s game revenge. “My mindset’s not on revenge,” he said. “We’re two different teams right now.” Smith Jr. likely is right in his assessment of playing the Jayhawks without Robinson and the likes of former guard Tyshawn Taylor among others. Kansas (9-1) might not be quite the team it was last year – but maybe neither are the Buckeyes, which find themselves in a similar boat without the inside presence of former forward Jared Sullinger. “We’re trying to do our best with what we still have,” Smith Jr. said. And while the teams – in their personnel and dynamics – are different, the stakes aren’t quite as dissimilar. Similar to both meetings in 2011, Saturday’s showdown finds both clubs toward the top of the Associated Press poll-OSU at No. 7 and Kansas at No 9. In a 30- or 40-game season, such a contest seems to inevitably have an inability to genuinely shape the course of success for either program. But the outcome could serve as a projection. It did last season, after all. “Obviously you’re going to hopefully learn quite a bit about your basketball team as you get ready to head into January, February, March,” said OSU coach Thad Matta. “My job is to keep thinking big picture and knowing what lies ahead, but you use this game as an opportunity.” Even inside the confines of the Schottenstein Center, Matta maintains an “experienced, seasoned” Jayhawks squad pose a threat that will almost certainly challenge an OSU team that’s been largely untested – save for a 73-68 loss against Duke on Nov. 28 at Cameron Indoor Stadium. “I think Kansas right now is playing at a level as high as anybody in college basketball,” Matta said. “They start four seniors. Man, it’s like wow.” Smith Jr. said Saturday might just to come down to which team proves more durable. “I think for both teams this game is going to be a toughness match,” he said. He’s not alone in that theory, either. “Who’s going to be the tougher basketball team?” said OSU junior guard Aaron Craft. “They do a phenomenal job of getting second-chance points, grabbing 50-50 balls, really limiting possessions for us offensively. “We have to find a way to overcome that – if not match that, or be better (than) their intensity and their toughness. Because that’s what Kansas basketball is about.” The features Craft listed seem to be suggestive of a team matching its talent with as much effort. OSU, arguably, has struggled with that coming into its game against the Jayhawks, and it might have been best exemplified against a mediocre Big South squad Tuesday, when OSU eked out perhaps its most ugly win of the season, 66-55, against Winthrop. “I guess what we’ve learned is we’re not gonna be able to just come out here any given night and think we’re gonna play our best basketball,” Smith Jr. said. “We have to mentally prepare for that leading up to the game.” “It’s part of being a winner and we’ve lacked on some (of) that sometimes.” read more

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Giggs satisfied with Wales performance

first_imgDespite having lost the final of the China Cup 1-0 to Uruguay, Ryan Giggs has described himself as happy with the entire squad’s overall performance in the tournamentWales had their chances to open the scoring against Uruguay with Andy King twice coming close to scoring against goalkeeper Fernando Muslera. Gareth Bale later forced the Uruguayan into another fine save, but they appeared to lose their rhythm after Edinson Cavani scored after the break in his 100th appearance at international level.“Of course, against teams like that you’re going to ride your luck but they showed us the utmost respect,” said Giggs, according to Sky Sports.“We won’t play against much better teams than that in terms of experience and talent. It was a great learning curve for the players and a great test which I thought they stood up to.“What I want from my team is to go to the end and I thought we did. Suarez and Cavani were going to the end, and we were still in the game.“Ryan Hedges put in that fantastic cross right at the end, and on another day we’d have got someone on the end of it.”Players who made it public that they weren’t happy in their club Jozef Fabian – September 12, 2019 Football is about so much more than what happens on the pitch.Overall the newly appointed Wales manager was pleased with their overall performance in the tournament and believes that there is a lot of promise within the squad.“We’ve had two very different opponents and two different performances, but equally pleasing in many ways.“I have learned there is a fantastic team spirit which I knew beforehand but then witnessing it was brilliant.“There’s also a lot of quality in the squad, and more that’s been left at home as well.“I’m really happy with the young lads who have come in and done well and with the squad as a whole.”last_img read more

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Noble The sky is the limit for Declan Rice

first_imgWest Ham captain Mark Noble welcomed the news that Declan Rice had signed a new long-term contract and expects big things from him in the futureThe 19-year-old midfielder has already made 51 appearances for West Ham after graduating the academy and he’s now committed his future to the club until June 2024.And Noble, who himself came through the youth ranks, is delighted with the news that Rice will be sticking around and revealed the advice he gave him.“It is fantastic news for both Declan and for the football club,” Noble told the club website.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“I have spoken to him regularly about his situation and Declan is on a massive high now. He’s come into the team, he’s playing fantastically well and now he has signed a new long-term contract, which he thoroughly deserves.“I’ve said to him that I’m always here for him because times aren’t always good and aren’t always smooth playing in the Premier League at a high level, so I’ve told him to keep learning, keep improving and keep enjoying it.“For him, I think the sky is the limit and I’ve always said that. He’s a top player and every day that I can help him along in his journey is something to be proud of.”West Ham will face Burnley on Sunday at Turf Moor in the Premier League.last_img read more

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Flipboard raises 50 Million and Lifts Valuation to 800 Million

first_imgThis week it was reported that the social magazine platform, Flipboard, raised an additional $50 million, which speculatively ups its valuation to $800 million.Reports suggest that Rizvi Traverse Management and Goldman Sachs led the fundraising efforts. However, Flipboard has declined to comment on, or confirm the transaction.The company has been growing quickly since launching just 3 years ago. Flipboard’s last round of capital injection came back in 2011, when it rallied $50 million on a $200 million valuation. More than 2 million magazines are active on the platform, and it has been evolving in several ways–in product and partnerships. But the latest angel investment begs to ask: what’s next? Speculating what the company might do with the money is anyone’s guess at this point–especially because its fundraising efforts have not been confirmed by any of the parties involved. Nevertheless, the company’s rapid growth and quest for more liquidity suggests big things could be on the horizon.Whether it’s preparing for an IPO, a major acquisition, a robust product launch or a countless other possibilities, one thing seems certain: Flipboard isn’t done growing.last_img read more

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