Its National Pancake Day at IHOP

first_img KUSI Newsroom March 12, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – You can get a free breakfast and do a good deed at the same time.Tuesday is IHOP free pancake day!Customers can get a short stack of original buttermilk pancakes for free.While you don’t have to pay, IHOP is collecting donations.The event runs from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., at all IHOP restaurants. During your visit,you can get free pancakes and make a donation Children’s Miracle Network which benefits Rady Children’s.The free pancake deal is dine-in only. You can’t take it to go. Posted: March 12, 2019 Updated: 12:56 PMcenter_img Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter It’s National Pancake Day at IHOP KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

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The AudioQuest DragonFly Cobalt digital converter The cure for the Bluetooth blues

first_img Tags 5 Share your voice Comments The AudioQuest DragonFly Cobalt  AudioQuest If you find most audiophile gear too bulky and too expensive but you’re still interested in good headphone sound, may I direct your attention over to the AudioQuest DragonFly Cobalt? It’s a tiny USB digital converter and portable headphone amp, and it sells for $299 in the US, £269 in the UK and AU$549 in Australia. More good news: the still-terrific AudioQuest DragonFly Black ($100, £68, AU$139) and DragonFly Red ($200, £169, AU$275) aren’t going away, but the Cobalt aims higher and boasts a new and more powerful digital converter chip, a faster microprocessor that draws less power, and an improved, more noise-resistant power supply than the Red, the previous DragonFly flagship.Did I mention Cobalt is really small? Just 2.3 by 0.7 by 0.47 inches (57 by 19 by 12mm), and connectivity via USB to any Apple or Windows computer, or with adapter cables to iOS or Android phones. Cobalt’s 3.5mm analog jack can be used with headphones or to connect to desktop powered speakers, receivers or an amplifier’s stereo input. Into the BlueI started listening to the Cobalt with a set of Sony MDR 1A headphones with ambient music from Sam Gendel’s Pass If Music album. The sound wasn’t confined to the Sony’s ear cups, it floated free like a cloud. Gendel’s music has a breathy, swirling abstract quality you can lose yourself in. I knew right then and there the Cobalt’s audiophile cred was assured. Cobalt is a high-resolution PCM converter, with up to 24-bit/96kHz sampling rate. It also has built-in MQA decoding for Tidal music subscribers. dragonflys-820x461-2xzzzsssThe AudioQuest DragonFly family from left to right, the Black, Red, and Cobalt  AudioQuest Stop right there: thanks to the Cobalt I heard legitimate high-resolution sound with my iPhone 8 while streaming MQA files from Tidal. That’s huge — while some Android phones have had hi-res capability for years, Apple kept the standard resolution lid on tight up until now. Hi-res on an iPhone — wow!Take R&B/gospel great Mavis Staples’ latest album, We Get By, in MQA: her heartfelt singing came pouring through with the Cobalt over tough-to-drive Abyss Diana Phi headphones. Even better was The Fellini Album (also in MQA) of Nino Rota tunes written for Federico Fellini’s films. Performed by La Scala Philharmonic and conducted by Riccardo Chailly the sound was incredibly pure and vibrant, and never sounded quite like that before on an iPhone. Before I forget to mention it, the Cobalt also plays hi-res MQA files from Tidal over my Mac Mini computer.I also spent some time comparing the DragonFly Red to the DragonFly Cobalt through a set of Sennheiser Momentum headphones, and right away noted the Cobalt’s bass had more heft to it on Philip Bailey’s Love Will Find A Way album. The Red had a more forward, more immediate sound, but I liked that the Cobalt revealed more depth in the soundstage. The treble was more refined and subtly detailed with the Cobalt; it makes headphones sound like better headphones. To my ears, it absolutely sounded like it was worth an extra $100 over the Red.The AudioQuest DragonFly Cobalt is an impressive little device, and one that makes a case for the superiority of wired headphone sound in 2019. If you’ve already invested in decent wired headphones and don’t want to go wireless, the Cobalt is well worth considering! Headphones Audio The Audiophiliaclast_img read more

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Suu Kyi iterates readiness to receive verified Rohingyas

first_imgAung San Suu Kyi . Reuters file photoMyanmar’s state counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi underscored Myanmar’s readiness to receive the verified Rohingyas and necessary cooperation of Bangladesh to expedite the repatriation process.She said this when a UN Security Council delegation met Myanmar’s civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi at the foreign affairs ministry on Monday.She said it is important for Bangladesh side to use prescribed forms agreed by both countries as early as possible for verification, according to Myanmar state councellor’s Office.The state counsellor received the delegation composed of permanent representatives to the United Nations or representatives from immediate neighbours of Myanmar including current ASEAN chair, and member states of the United Nations Security Council upon their arrival in Nay Pyi Taw.The Myanmar state counsellor also explained to the delegation on the matters pertaining to providing humanitarian assistance to affected communities, rebuilding trust and confidence among communities, citizenship issue, on-going closure of IDP camps, issuance of national verification cards(NVCs), restoring rule of law, issue of resettlement on the international boundary line between the two countries, possible recurrence of terrorist attacks at any time, necessity to find the root cause of the conflict, prevention of hate speech, and encouragement for school education.Afterwards, the delegation met with senior general Min Aung Hlaing, Commander-in-chief of defence services at the office of the commander-in-chief in the afternoon.Then, the delegation held a comprehensive discussion with Kyaw Tint Swe, union minister for the office of the state counsellor, Thaung Tun,Union minister for the office of the union government, Win Myat Aye, union minister for social welfare, Relief and resettlement and chairman of the implementation committee on recommendations on Rakhine state, Kyaw Tin, union minister for international cooperation, Aung Tun Thet, chief coordinator of Union Enterprise for Humanitarian Assistance, Resettlement, and Development in Rakhine (UEHRD), Win Mra, Tun Myat, Khin Maung Lay, Hla Myint and Daw Khin Nyo, who are national members of advisory board on Rakhine state.The UN Security Council delegation on Tuesday was visiting volatile areas of Myanmar’s Rakhine state, from where hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims have fled military-led violence to see firsthand the aftermath of the army’s crackdown as well as Myanmar’s preparations for taking back the refugees, reports the Associated Press.The 15-member delegation co-led by Security Council president Gustavo Meza-Cuadra was joined by Rakhine state and central government officials and ministers heading to Maungdaw in northern Rakhine where the Myanmar government has built reception camps for the Rohingya refugees now living in camps and other temporary shelters in Bangladesh.”The delegation will be visiting Taungpyo and Hla Phoe Khaung reception camps in Maungdaw region,” said Myint Khine, a township administrator of Maungdaw.Bangladesh and Myanmar agreed in December to begin repatriating the refugees in January, but there were concerns among rights groups and Rohingya that they would be forced to return and face unsafe conditions in Myanmar.The UN refugee agency and Bangladesh recently finalised a memorandum of understanding that said the repatriation process must be “safe, voluntary and dignified … in line with international standards.”The UN refugee chief, Filippo Grandi, warned in February that conditions aren’t right for Rohingya Muslims to voluntarily return to Myanmar because its government hasn’t addressed their exclusion, denial of rights and lack of citizenship.UN secretary-general Antonio Guterres has repeatedly stressed that the Rohingyas return must be voluntary and they must be allowed to return to their homes which will require a huge investment for reconstruction because of the destruction.Some human rights activists would like to see more aggressive action by the UN.”The other thing the Security Council should do is refer the situation in Rakhine state to the International Criminal Court,” Kenneth Roth, the executive director of Human Rights Watch, said Friday in a speech to journalists in Yangon, Myanmar’s biggest city.”The crimes against humanity that were committed against the Rohingya population were clearly of the gravity and severity that they warrant prosecution by the ICC. If impunity were to prevail it would be an enormous injustice to the victims and their families, and it would only encourage a repetition of these kinds of mass atrocities,” Roth said.last_img read more

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Scientists investigate how electric current flows in multilayer 2D materials

first_img © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. Citation: Scientists investigate how electric current flows in multilayer 2-D materials (2013, July 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-07-scientists-electric-current-multilayer-d.html The researchers, Saptarshi Das and Joerg Appenzeller at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, have published their paper on current flow in 2-D layered materials in a recent issue of Nano Letters.”Through our experimental approach, we have devised a new way to understand the current flow through these low-dimensional materials, and we also discovered that the conventional models for carrier transport that apply to bulk materials need to be revised for layered 2-D systems,” Das told Phys.org.In their study, the scientists experimentally evaluated the current flow and distribution in a transistor made of 2-D MoS2, which was about 8 nm thick and consisted of approximately 13 layers. As the scientists explained, the current in the individual layers cannot be directly measured. So they devised an alternate method to map the current distribution in the multiple layers, which involves channel length scaling using a scanning electron microscope. The scientists found that the current in 2-D MoS2 is distributed among the 13 layers so that the top layers have the highest mobility and lowest resistances, while the bottom layers have the lowest mobility and highest resistance. By calculating the weighted average of the current in the individual layers, the researchers determined the location of the “HOT-SPOT” as the center of the current distribution, which in this case was at the top layers. However, when the scientists changed the bias voltage applied to the gate, the location of the “HOT-SPOT” also changed. At high gate bias values, the resistance of each layer is low and the “HOT-SPOT” is located at the top layers. But when the gate bias is decreased, the resistance increases and the “HOT-SPOT” migrates to the lower layers. This unusual migration of the “HOT-SPOT” as a function of the applied gate bias also gives rise to an additional resistance that the researchers call “interlayer resistance,” which is not found in 3-D materials and cannot be explained within the conventional model of current flow based on Schottky barrier contacts.The scientists also experimentally evaluated the current flow and distribution in 2-D graphene consisting of about 13 layers, and observed opposite effects compared to the MoS2. Namely, the researchers found that the current predominately flows to the bottom layers in graphene, which is where the “HOT-SPOT” is located, while the top layers have a higher resistance. The researchers explain that this difference occurs because graphene and MoS2 have different physical properties, and the position of the “HOT-SPOT” is governed by a material’s physical properties. By knowing the physical properties of a multilayer 2-D material, the position of the “HOT-SPOT” can be predicted with a 5% error margin.Understanding the current flow and distribution in multilayer 2-D materials—along with knowing that these features differ for different materials—will likely prove very useful when designing future electronics components.”Understanding the carrier transport in low-dimensional materials is not only appealing from a fundamental scientific standpoint, but also equally important in the context of high-performance device design,” Das said. “Our experimental study combined with analytical modeling provides novel insights on the current flow in two-dimensional layered materials like MoS2 and graphene, which will be helpful for many researchers working in this field.”Das added that his future work will focus on the implementation of new device concepts based on novel 2-D materials that utilizes their unique electrical, mechanical and optical properties. More information: Saptarshi Das and Joerg Appenzeller. “Where Does the Current Flow in Two-Dimensional Layered Systems?” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/nl401831u Explore further (Left) In 2-D, 13-layer MoS2, the “HOT SPOT” (the center of current distribution) is located in the upper layers at a large gate bias. (Right) In 2-D, 13-layer graphene, the “HOT SPOT” is located in the lower layers at a large gate bias. The difference arises because the location of a “HOT SPOT” is due to the material’s physical properties. Credit: Das and Appenzeller. ©2013 American Chemical Societycenter_img (Phys.org) —Although scientists continue to discover the remarkable electronic properties of nanomaterials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, the way that electric current flows at this scale is not well understood. In a new study, scientists for the first time have investigated exactly how a current flows through multilayer 2-D materials, and found that current flow in these materials is very different than current flow in 3-D materials and cannot be explained with conventional models. This understanding could guide researchers in designing future nanoelectronics devices. Graphene-based transistor seen as candidate for post-CMOS technology Journal information: Nano Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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