Meredith Zinczenko Partner On Mag Launch

first_imgMeredith and David Zinczenko’s Galvanized agency are partnering on the launch of a quarterly magazine built off of the latter’s successful “Eat This, Not That!” healthy-eating franchise.The first issue will be distributed at 80,000 newsstands starting Dec. 2, though Meredith wouldn’t release the total draw. Galvanized will handle editorial, while Meredith is responsible for printing, distribution, sales and marketing. With heavy paper stock, a thick folio and a hefty $13 price tag, the magazine is built on reader revenue, but advertising still plays a small part. Just one of its 120 pages—the back-cover—is an ad, but Meredith says it’s looking to expand on that base in future issues. It’s a model that the publisher has used in the past, according to Tom Harty, president of Meredith’s national media group.”We have produced a number of high quality publications through our Special Interest Media Group on topics from food to home décor to kitchen and bath design,” he says. “Frequently called ‘bookazines,’ these titles typically sell for a higher price point.”The content also meshes well with Meredith’s portfolio of epicurean and healthy-living brands, including Eating Well, allrecipes and Fitness. Meredith’s deal doesn’t extend to Web content or books, however.For Zinczenko and Galvanized, the magazine launch is the first piece of a franchise reboot that will include a new website, mobile apps, digital magazine and two new books.Zinczenko, the former editor-in-chief of Men’s Health and founder of “Eat This, Not That!,” bought the brand from Rodale, his former employer, in September for an undisclosed amount. The franchise has produced 16 books and sold more than 7 million copies since its debut in 2007.last_img read more

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The AudioQuest DragonFly Cobalt digital converter The cure for the Bluetooth blues

first_img Tags 5 Share your voice Comments The AudioQuest DragonFly Cobalt  AudioQuest If you find most audiophile gear too bulky and too expensive but you’re still interested in good headphone sound, may I direct your attention over to the AudioQuest DragonFly Cobalt? It’s a tiny USB digital converter and portable headphone amp, and it sells for $299 in the US, £269 in the UK and AU$549 in Australia. More good news: the still-terrific AudioQuest DragonFly Black ($100, £68, AU$139) and DragonFly Red ($200, £169, AU$275) aren’t going away, but the Cobalt aims higher and boasts a new and more powerful digital converter chip, a faster microprocessor that draws less power, and an improved, more noise-resistant power supply than the Red, the previous DragonFly flagship.Did I mention Cobalt is really small? Just 2.3 by 0.7 by 0.47 inches (57 by 19 by 12mm), and connectivity via USB to any Apple or Windows computer, or with adapter cables to iOS or Android phones. Cobalt’s 3.5mm analog jack can be used with headphones or to connect to desktop powered speakers, receivers or an amplifier’s stereo input. Into the BlueI started listening to the Cobalt with a set of Sony MDR 1A headphones with ambient music from Sam Gendel’s Pass If Music album. The sound wasn’t confined to the Sony’s ear cups, it floated free like a cloud. Gendel’s music has a breathy, swirling abstract quality you can lose yourself in. I knew right then and there the Cobalt’s audiophile cred was assured. Cobalt is a high-resolution PCM converter, with up to 24-bit/96kHz sampling rate. It also has built-in MQA decoding for Tidal music subscribers. dragonflys-820x461-2xzzzsssThe AudioQuest DragonFly family from left to right, the Black, Red, and Cobalt  AudioQuest Stop right there: thanks to the Cobalt I heard legitimate high-resolution sound with my iPhone 8 while streaming MQA files from Tidal. That’s huge — while some Android phones have had hi-res capability for years, Apple kept the standard resolution lid on tight up until now. Hi-res on an iPhone — wow!Take R&B/gospel great Mavis Staples’ latest album, We Get By, in MQA: her heartfelt singing came pouring through with the Cobalt over tough-to-drive Abyss Diana Phi headphones. Even better was The Fellini Album (also in MQA) of Nino Rota tunes written for Federico Fellini’s films. Performed by La Scala Philharmonic and conducted by Riccardo Chailly the sound was incredibly pure and vibrant, and never sounded quite like that before on an iPhone. Before I forget to mention it, the Cobalt also plays hi-res MQA files from Tidal over my Mac Mini computer.I also spent some time comparing the DragonFly Red to the DragonFly Cobalt through a set of Sennheiser Momentum headphones, and right away noted the Cobalt’s bass had more heft to it on Philip Bailey’s Love Will Find A Way album. The Red had a more forward, more immediate sound, but I liked that the Cobalt revealed more depth in the soundstage. The treble was more refined and subtly detailed with the Cobalt; it makes headphones sound like better headphones. To my ears, it absolutely sounded like it was worth an extra $100 over the Red.The AudioQuest DragonFly Cobalt is an impressive little device, and one that makes a case for the superiority of wired headphone sound in 2019. If you’ve already invested in decent wired headphones and don’t want to go wireless, the Cobalt is well worth considering! Headphones Audio The Audiophiliaclast_img read more

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Nasa showcases potential new heart pump motor

first_imgAn animation released by Nasa on social media on 8 March showcases a new piece of technology which could give hope to people born with a missing ventricle. The video shows a heart motor pump that uses flywheel technology produced by Doctor Mark Rodefeld at Nasas Glenn Research Center.Flywheel technology is a type of technology that features a motor gaining incredible speed and then maintaining the energy produced as rotational or kinetic energy. Rhodes states on Nasas website that the idea behind the pump is to help those, particularly children, who are born with half a heart and therefore lack the full system to pump blood round their bodies.The current method of dealing with this problem is to have a heart transplant or the Fontan procedure, which is a set of surgeries that creates a passive version of the blood pumping system within the heart. Rodefelds solution was to create a small conical pump, driven by an electrical motor to be placed into an existing heart network. This would reproduce the pressures and flow coming from the body and head, reducing the wear and tear on the single remaining ventricle and extend the life of the patient.A team of scientists and researchers spent two years designing and creating prototypes based on Rodefelds idea and their initial tests have been successful. But Nasa states on its website that further development is needed as the pump will need to be the size of a nickel in order to work. Rodefeld hopes that he will be able to engage more engineers at Glenn in the development of the project, with the goal of advancing this life-saving technology in young patients.last_img read more

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